Black Eye Galaxy

M64 - The Black Eye Galaxy: Type, Age, Size, Diameter, Mass, Location, Facts, Distance from Earth

Black Eye Galaxy M64

The universe is vast and is home to several galaxies, each with unique features and characteristics. One such galaxy is the Black Eye Galaxy, also known as Messier 64. It is a spiral galaxy that is located in the Coma Berenices constellation, approximately 17 million light-years away from the Earth. This post will take a deep dive into the Black Eye Galaxy and explore its features, history, and importance in the universe.

What Type of Galaxy is M64 The Black Eye Galaxy

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy is classified as a spiral galaxy. It is known for its distinct dark band of obscuring dust, resembling a black eye.

How old is M64 The Black Eye Galaxy

Determining the exact age of M64 The Black Eye Galaxy is challenging, but it is estimated to be approximately around 12 billion years. The age estimation involves studying the galaxy's stellar populations and the history of star formation, providing insights into its cosmic age.

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy Size in Light Years

The size of M64 The Black Eye Galaxy encompasses an expansive region of approximately about 55,000 light-years.

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy Diameter in Light Years and Compared to Milky Way

The diameter of M64 The Black Eye Galaxy is approximately about 55,000 light-years. Compared to the Milky Way, M64 is of similar size, making it a galaxy of considerable dimensions.

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy Mass in Solar Masses

Estimates suggest that the mass of M64 The Black Eye Galaxy is approximately about 160 billion solar masses. Galaxy mass influences gravitational interactions and internal processes, and M64's mass places it within the range of spiral galaxies.

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy Location

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy is located in the constellation Coma Berenices. Positioned in the northern celestial hemisphere, Coma Berenices is home to various celestial objects, and M64 stands out as a notable member. Its location makes it accessible for observation and study.

10 Interesting Fun Facts about M64 The Black Eye Galaxy

  1. M64 is also known as the "Black Eye" or "Evil Eye" galaxy due to the prominent dark feature in its central region.
  2. The dark band is composed of dust and obscures the light from stars behind it, creating a striking visual appearance.
  3. The galaxy was discovered by Edward Pigott in 1779 and independently by Johann Elert Bode in 1780.
  4. M64's spiral arms contain regions of active star formation, producing clusters of young, bright stars.
  5. It is part of the M94 Group of galaxies, which includes several other galaxies in close proximity.
  6. The dark structure in M64's nucleus is believed to be the result of a gravitational interaction with a smaller galaxy.
  7. Studies of M64 have revealed complex gas dynamics and star formation processes within its spiral arms.
  8. The galaxy has been observed in various wavelengths, including radio and X-rays, providing insights into its properties.
  9. M64 is a popular target for amateur astronomers and astrophotographers due to its unique appearance.
  10. Observations of M64 contribute to our understanding of galaxy evolution and interactions.

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy Distance from Earth in Light Years and Miles / Km

M64 The Black Eye Galaxy is situated at an approximate distance of about 17 million light-years from Earth. Converting this distance, it is approximately 9.95e+19 miles (1.60e+20 km) away. This distance places it in the realm of relatively distant galaxies, and studies of M64 provide valuable insights into the features and dynamics of spiral galaxies.

History

The Black Eye Galaxy was discovered by Edward Pigott, an English astronomer, in March 1779. Later that year, Charles Messier independently discovered the galaxy and added it to his famous astronomical catalog as Messier 64. The galaxy's name comes from the dark band of dust that encircles its center, giving it the appearance of a black eye.

Black Eye Galaxy

Physical Characteristics

The Black Eye Galaxy is a type of spiral galaxy known as an S0a, which means it has a central bulge and spiral arms. The galaxy has a diameter of approximately 50,000 light-years, making it slightly smaller than our Milky Way galaxy. The central bulge of the galaxy is home to older stars, while the spiral arms contain young, bright stars.

The most striking feature of the Black Eye Galaxy is the dark band of dust that encircles its center. This dust is made up of tiny particles of carbon, hydrogen, and other elements that absorb visible light, making the center of the galaxy appear black. In addition to the dust, the galaxy also contains several bright regions of gas and dust where new stars are being formed.

Importance

The Black Eye Galaxy is an important object of study for astronomers because it provides insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. The dark band of dust that surrounds the galaxy's center is thought to be the result of a collision between two smaller galaxies. This collision would have caused gas and dust to be compressed, leading to the formation of new stars.

In addition to its scientific importance, the Black Eye Galaxy is also a beautiful object to observe through a telescope. Its dark band of dust and bright regions of star formation make it a favorite among amateur astronomers.

Formation of Black Eye Galaxy

FormationĀ of Black Eye Galaxy

The Black Eye Galaxy's structure suggests that it has undergone some kind of interaction with another galaxy in the past. Many galaxies, including the Milky Way, are thought to have grown through the merging of smaller galaxies. In the case of the Black Eye Galaxy, it is believed that a smaller galaxy collided with the galaxy's center, causing the dark band of dust that surrounds it.

The collision would have caused the gas and dust in the two galaxies to collide and compress, leading to the formation of new stars. This theory is supported by observations of the galaxy, which show that the central bulge is made up of older stars, while the spiral arms contain younger, brighter stars.

Black Eye Galaxy location

The Black Eye Galaxy is located in the Coma Berenices constellation, which is located in the northern sky. The constellation is named after Queen Berenice II of Egypt and is bordered by the constellations Canes Venatici, Leo, and Virgo. The Black Eye Galaxy is located approximately 17 million light-years away from Earth, making it a relatively close neighbor in astronomical terms.

Black Eye Galaxy distance from Earth

As previously mentioned, the Black Eye Galaxy is located approximately 17 million light-years away from Earth. To put that into perspective, one light-year is equivalent to about 5.9 trillion miles. This means that the light we see from the Black Eye Galaxy today began its journey towards Earth 17 million years ago. This distance makes it a popular target for astronomers studying distant galaxies and the early universe.

Black Eye Galaxy distance from Earth

Black Eye Galaxy size

The Black Eye Galaxy is a type of spiral galaxy known as an S0a galaxy. It has a diameter of approximately 50,000 light-years, which is slightly smaller than our own Milky Way galaxy. The galaxy's central bulge is home to older stars, while the spiral arms contain younger, brighter stars. The dark band of dust that encircles the galaxy's center is made up of tiny particles of carbon, hydrogen, and other elements that absorb visible light, making the center of the galaxy appear black.

How to observe Black Eye Galaxy

Observing the Black Eye Galaxy requires a telescope, as it is not visible to the naked eye. It is best seen during the spring months in the northern hemisphere, when it is located high in the sky. To find the galaxy, locate the constellation Coma Berenices and look for a faint smudge of light. The galaxy's dark band of dust should be visible through a telescope, along with its bright regions of gas and dust where new stars are being formed.

How to observe Black Eye Galaxy

Observations

The Black Eye Galaxy is a popular target for both professional and amateur astronomers. It is relatively easy to observe, as it is located in a relatively empty area of the sky. The galaxy is best seen during the spring months in the northern hemisphere, when it is located high in the sky.

Observations of the galaxy have revealed many interesting features. The dark band of dust that surrounds the galaxy's center is one of its most distinctive features. The dust absorbs visible light, making the center of the galaxy appear black. In addition to the dust, the galaxy also contains several bright regions of gas and dust where new stars are being formed.

Studying the Black Eye Galaxy

The Black Eye Galaxy is an important object of study for astronomers because it provides insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. By studying the galaxy's structure and history, astronomers can learn more about how galaxies form and grow over time.

One of the most interesting aspects of the Black Eye Galaxy is the dark band of dust that surrounds its center. This dust is thought to be the result of a collision between two smaller galaxies, which compressed gas and dust, leading to the formation of new stars. Studying the dust and the stars in the galaxy's center can provide insights into the conditions that led to the collision and the subsequent star formation.

In addition to its scientific importance, the Black Eye Galaxy is also a beautiful object to observe through a telescope. Its unique features and striking appearance make it a favorite among amateur astronomers.

Black Eye Galaxy facts

Black Eye Galaxy facts

  1. The Black Eye Galaxy is located in the Coma Berenices constellation in the northern sky, approximately 17 million light-years away from Earth.
  2. The galaxy is a type of spiral galaxy known as an S0a galaxy and has a diameter of approximately 50,000 light-years, making it slightly smaller than our Milky Way galaxy.
  3. The Black Eye Galaxy gets its name from the dark band of dust that surrounds its center, which gives it the appearance of a black eye.
  4. The galaxy's central bulge is made up of older stars, while the spiral arms contain younger, brighter stars.
  5. The dark band of dust that surrounds the galaxy's center is made up of tiny particles of carbon, hydrogen, and other elements that absorb visible light, making the center of the galaxy appear black.
  6. The Black Eye Galaxy was discovered by Edward Pigott in March 1779, and later that year, Charles Messier independently discovered it and added it to his famous astronomical catalog.
  7. Observing the Black Eye Galaxy requires a telescope, as it is not visible to the naked eye. It is best seen during the spring months in the northern hemisphere, when it is located high in the sky.
  8. The galaxy's unique features and structure make it an important object of study for astronomers, providing valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies.
  9. The dark band of dust that surrounds the galaxy's center is thought to be the result of a collision between two smaller galaxies, which compressed gas and dust and led to the formation of new stars.
  10. The Black Eye Galaxy is a popular target for both professional and amateur astronomers due to its striking appearance and proximity to Earth.

Black Eye Galaxy

Here's a detailed table describing the Black Eye Galaxy:

Property Description
Name Black Eye Galaxy or Messier 64
Type Spiral galaxy (S0a)
Location Coma Berenices constellation in the northern sky
Distance Approximately 17 million light-years away from Earth
Size Diameter of approximately 50,000 light-years, slightly smaller than the Milky Way galaxy
Central bulge Made up of older stars
Spiral arms Contain younger, brighter stars
Dark band of dust Surrounds the galaxy's center and is made up of tiny particles of carbon, hydrogen, and other elements that absorb visible light, making the center of the galaxy appear black
Discovery Discovered by Edward Pigott in March 1779; later independently discovered and cataloged by Charles Messier
Importance Provides valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies; the dark band of dust is thought to be the result of a collision between two smaller galaxies, leading to the formation of new stars
Observing Requires a telescope, as it is not visible to the naked eye; best seen during the spring months in the northern hemisphere, when it is located high in the sky

The Black Eye Galaxy is a fascinating object in the universe with a unique appearance and structure that provides valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. Observing this galaxy requires a telescope, but its striking features, including the dark band of dust and bright regions of gas and dust, make it well worth the effort.

Black Eye Galaxy Information

Conclusion

The Black Eye Galaxy, also known as Messier 64, is a fascinating object in the universe. Its dark band of dust and bright regions of star formation make it a popular target for both professional and amateur astronomers. The galaxy's structure and history provide valuable insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies, making it an important object of study for astronomers. Whether you are a professional astronomer or an amateur stargazer, the Black Eye Galaxy is definitely worth observing through a telescope.

More Galaxies:

Ā 

Back to blog